Wednesday, 20 May 2015

Fully-funded collaborative PhD scholarships

We invite applications for two full-time, funded PhD commencing in September 2015 in the School of Arts and Creative Industries. The scholarships provide the opportunity to undertake a specifically themed collaborative doctoral research project in partnership with one of the following arts organisations, The Photographers' Gallery or Hammersmith United Charities.

The scholarships cover fees and offer a stipend of £15,000 p.a. for three years.


Curating Ubiquity: Photographic Value After the Internet

Whilst the photographic image has become a ubiquitous feature of digital culture, it has undergone far-reaching transformations through computational systems. This has meant that understandings of the photograph in culture are radically different from understandings of the photographic image as data. What is needed is research, which examines the relationship between cultural and historical knowledge of photography contained in photographic collections, archives, museums and exhibitions and the formation and circulation of the image in computational culture. The Photographers' Gallery is especially interested in the ways in which the image is increasingly apprehended as part of a screen interface and what this means for new forms of online exhibition. How in cultural institutions is the networked image to be valued, selected and curated?

The researcher will work directly with The Photographers' Gallery and will have the opportunity to undertake fieldwork as part of gallery's forthcoming Unthinking Photography programme. For an informal discussion about this scholarship please contact Professor Andrew Dewdney.


Tackling Deprivation: Understanding the Contribution of the Arts

There is anecdotal evidence that participation in community arts projects has the potential to make a significant – sometimes seemingly life-changing – impact on those involved. Project evaluations report a range of responses from participants, which include enhanced self-confidence, pride, a sense of connectedness, new skills. But if the arts are to be seen as a major tool in combatting deprivation and enhancing community cohesion, research is needed to measure and define those benefits and establish the long-term impacts of these projects. Is the nature of the benefits gained identifiably different from the benefits gained by participants in other types of projects? Can we establish a longitudinal study to find out what do participants go on to do? Can we find ways to put a value on the positive impact of these projects? What is the wider impact on participants’ families and communities? And are there ways in which the Charity could use arts projects in a more innovative way to achieve its wider objectives?

The researcher will work directly with Hammersmith United Charities, which operates a place based grants programme, conducting field work and action research alongside that programme with the academic support of the school. For an informal discussion about this scholarship please contact Jonathan Banatvala.


How to apply

The scholarship application form can be found here: 
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/how-to-apply

Please provide an additional covering letter identifying which scholarship you are applying for. The deadline for applications is Friday 19 June 2015.

Saturday, 7 February 2015

Playing with Affection

Playing with Affection: A night of love, sweat and tears, game style

Thursday 12 February, 7 pm 
K2 Building, London South Bank University
Keyworth Street, London SE1





There won't be any chocolates or Shakespeare sonnets or marriage proposals (maybe??), but one thing is for certain…you won't want to miss this event: it's entirely, 100%, dedicated to LOVE in games.

Here's the line up:

Aubrey "I always confuse oxytocin for oxy acetylene" Hesselgren, Independent Game Developer is presenting on the taboo of systematizing emotions

Ste Curran, game consultant and world speaker, for one night only, is sure to break a few hearts with his secret love talk

Christos Reid, independent game developer, will present Butterfly Mechanics: How to represent a first date through videogame systems

James Wallis, founder of game consultancy Spaaace, is addressing Trouble and Strife: getting the girl in Final Fantasy VII

Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Research Fellow, Digital Cultures Research Centre, launches her book Game Love: Essays on Play and Affection, co-edited with Jessica Enevold

We'll retire to the Albert Arms, as always, for a little post-event charm and chitchat.

This event is free and open to all, but places are limited. If you'd like to come please email Siobhán Thomas.

Thursday, 22 January 2015

Motherhood and Creative Practice Conference

Motherhood and creative practice: Maternal structures in creative work
June 1-2, 2015
School of Arts and Creative Industries, London South Bank University, London
Motherhood and creative practice: Maternal structures in creative work is an international and interdisciplinary conference that addresses ongoing debates about hospitality, solidarity and encounter as concepts in creative practice, and how they relate to contemporary issues of mothering. Mothering involves commitment to creative balance and combining everyday chores. We are interested how practitioners combine art and mothering, activism and mothering, academia and mothering, science and mothering, mothering and allomothering. The conference will look at practice where the creative exploration, writing and theory about the mOther cannot be separated from one another. Ettinger reveals the intricate connections between critical theory on maternal and creative practice. According to Vigneault, the porous spaces of work that engages with the maternal as concept presents passageways which allow the viewer and reader to move through and between the various levels of text and image, theory and art, in a constant shift between modes of production (2009:69). There is a gradual, yet sustained increase in creative practices which, starting from the challenges posed by the above concepts, explore the maternal in various encounter-event formations. The conference will also look into female experiences and sexual lifestyles that explore the encounters of infertility, medical intervention, adoption and fostering, queer mothering and childlessness by choice or not. We invite scholars and artists to also explore the creative embodiment of intergenerational trauma and the complex territory of mother-daughter relationships, and bring into dialogue social, scientific and artistic perspectives.

Wednesday, 7 January 2015

Operations In Mixed Reality

The Drama and Performance Practice as Research Group invite you to this lecture presentation by Mark Jeffery and Judd Morrissey 

Studio 3/4, Borough Road Building
London South Bank University 
103 Borough Road, SE1 0AA



Monday 12 January, 1:30-3pm


Mark Jeffery and Judd Morrissey are a collaboration merging live art and digital literary practices. The work, which is visual, textual and choreographic, evolves through context-specific research and practice and always considers the constraints of a given venue or occasion. Site- responsive considerations include the performance/exhibition space as well as the local community and [online] textual activity happening within the locale. A given piece is a body of material that may have no singular fixed form but is alternately presented as internet art, durational live installation, an ongoing activity, or a performance of fixed length.

Jeffery and Morrissey have presented throughout the US, UK, and Europe with recent venues including, Inspace Gallery (Edinburgh), Performing House (York), Sullivan Galleries (Chicago), Defibrillator Gallery (Chicago), Hyde Park Salon Series (Chicago), Chicago Cultural Center, Bergen Bibliotek (Norway), Le Cube (Paris), Anatomical Theatre and Museum (London), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, National Museum of Health and Medicine (Chicago) and ZERO1, San Jose and Eyebeam NYC. They are artists in residence at the National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago. Both artists were members of the Chicago-based international performance collective Goat Island, Jeffery as a performer and collaborator for 13 years, and Morrissey as an external collaborator on writing and digital art projects for 5.

http://www.judisdaid.com/
http://www.markjefferyartist.org/
http://atom-r.tumblr.com/
http://atom-r.com/

This event is free and open to all but places are limited. If you would like to come, please email Dr Elena Marchevska

Monday, 5 January 2015

Do poets dream of electric ideas sleeping furiously?

CMCR Research Seminar

Friday 16 January, 1.30pm
Studio 55, Keyworth Centre
Keyworth Street SE1

Do poets dream of electric ideas sleeping furiously? Translating digital poetry in the digital age

Karlien van den Beukel

In the networked age, new digital translation tools – automatic online translation, crowdsourcing and translation apps – provide transparency to source texts in other languages, even as they assign to language an instrumental function, a purposive immediacy. As ‘frictionless, instantaneously convertible, simplified speech’ allows for easier translatability, devolved costs and efficacy of apps, corporate promotion of controlled versions of English in particular increase its global capacity as a service language.

Running ‘a Rilke poem through an online translation system would be inviting trouble’, as Michael Cronin puts it. The service language, in its unintelligible rendition of the poem, can only reveal the absence of the culture language, the dense semantic and historical specificity of language which supports ‘thoughts, imagination and dreams’. Poetry, especially post-romantic poetry, then, is seen to throw a spanner in the technocratic works, even as specialist humanities knowledge, or at least a local human, is required to translate it into English.

Yet what happens when poets use digital technologies to compose poems? Do they get the idea from media technology, or does it emerge from literary culture? Does a digital poem composed in another language require translation into the culture language – with English, localised cultural identities – or is it readily appreciated as a conceptual media work? Does digital poetry demand its own translation methods, and what are they?

This paper presents preliminarily findings of my practice-based research, translating the digital poems by the Dutch poet Tonnus Oosterhoff, contextualised both through avant-garde poetics and recent digital translation theory.

Materialisms Old and New - London Reading Group

You are invited to join the Materialisms Old and New reading group. We will be organising regular meetings to discuss both old and new materialist understandings of markets, rationalities, agency, contingency, power and governance.


This is not a lecture course so we will be mixing up the texts and approaching key or interesting readings in an informal and flexible way, with a brief introduction by one of the group.

Thursday 16 April: Annemarie Mol - The Body Multiple: Ontology in Medical Practice - introduced by Tudor Vilcan (University of Southhampton)


Thursday 5 March: Joanna Zylinska - Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene - introduced by Phil Hammond (London South Bank University)

Thursday 5 February: Rosi Braidotti - The Posthuman - introduced by Sara Raimondi (University of Westminster)

Thursday 15 January: Donna Haraway - Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature - introduced by Anna Feigenbaum (University of Bournemouth)

Thursday 27 November: John Law - After Method: Mess in social science research - introduced by David Chandler (University of Westminster)

Thursday 16 October: Roy Bhaskar -The Possibility of Naturalism: A philosophical critique of the contemporary human sciences - introduced by Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster)

Thursday 11 September: Karen Barad - Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum physics and the entanglement of matter and meaning - introduced by Allan Parsons (University of Westminster)

Thursday 24 April: Andrew Barry - Material Politics: Disputes along the Pipeline  - introduced by Robert Cowley (University of Westminster)

Wednesday 19 MarchWilliam Connolly, The Fragility of Things: Self-Organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism - introduced by David Chandler (University of Westminster)


Thursday 30 January: Michel Callon et al., Acting in an Uncertain World: An Essay on Technical Democracy - introduced by Michele Ledda (University of Westminster) 

Thursday 21 November: Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern - introduced by Philip Hammond (London South Bank University)

Friday 1 November: Nigel Thrift, Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect - introduced by Tara McCormack (University of Leicester)

Thursday 26 September: Noortje Marres, Material Participation: Technology the Environment and Everyday Publics - introduced by Noortje Marres (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Tuesday 18 June: John Dewey, The Public & its Problems - introduced by David Chandler (University of Westminster)

Tuesday 7 May: Arjun Appadurai (ed.) The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective - introduced by James Heartfield (University of Westminster)


Meetings are open to all and take place 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum,  Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube).


If you would like to be added to the working group mailing list, please email David Chandler.

Please feel free to forward these details to those you think might be interested.

David Chandler
Phil Hammond
James Heartfield

Sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and the Centre for Media & Culture Research, London South Bank University.